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20121129
20121207
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CNBC 6
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Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6
CNBC
Nov 29, 2012 4:00am EST
, the ryan airs, who continue to take market share and operate in a more difficult economic environment much more so than the flag carriers. however starting to look at the flag carriers again, in particular lufthansa. the iberian side of it will drag earnings down for quite a long time. air france still has significant employment issues. and if you're looking for a relatively undervalued, company which is taking itself and do significant cost cutting which i think it will bring through, you have conglomerate discounted lufthansa. it makes it a more interesting stock. >> at a time when europe doesn't have a lot of demand strength, if we're talking about reducing capacity, that means higher ticket prices and perhaps germany being one place where businesses can afford to pay up. >> i think that it's an element of probably relatively small part of overall. these are global businesses. they need to have global growth. but that is an interesting point for next year. >>'s most important for global demand then? >> with airlines it's about oil prices, in terms of capacity and reduced capacity. and i
CNBC
Dec 4, 2012 4:00am EST
. at least we see a deterioration in either the global environment or at least we see domestic growth really fall off from here. as the rba made the point and one that we agree with is that there's still time for these rate cuts which we've had delivered to pass through to the economy itself. we know monetary policy takes between one and two years to have an effect. >> what if on the contrary we get better growth out of china and we see commodity prices go up again and now when we've already had all these rate cuts, is there a risk then to inflation for the country? >> i think there is. that was one thing that the rba pointed to in the november statement, then worried that underlying inflation had ticked up towards the middle of the 2% to 3% target. i think from here, if we do get a scenario like that where the u.s. fiscal issues are resolved, i think the statement the rb after the has given us today probably puts them in a good position to be able to move policy higher if they have to next year in response to higher inflation. >> so what happens to the aussie dollar now? >> well, as i said,
CNBC
Nov 30, 2012 4:00am EST
. they could greatly benefit first maintaining a growth friendly business environment, and they could greatly benefit from reinventing their production structure, upgrading quality, and redistricting their exports towards strongly growing markets. innovation is crucial in this respect. this means for a start that where profit margins are restored, they should serve to fund research and development to higher extent. but innovation potential is not always translated into actual marketable employment creating and growth sustaining innovation. what is key in translating potential is the regime of economic incentives. and it is indeed this system of economic incentives that the current waiver of structural reforms in the euro area is addressing. central challenge is to set conditions so that the skills of the labor force especially of our young people can be profitably employed in competitive firms or in the new enterprises that will go on to set up. in this vain, removing rigidity clearly races the potential for growth and job creation. and this of course, the resumption of growth, is fundamental
CNBC
Dec 3, 2012 4:00am EST
that are on average 11.1 years of age that are really driving car sales. in this low interest rate environment, this is the other big ticket item. >> how are people going to fund their purchases? you have an 11-year-old car, how are they funding the replacement of it? >> well, the availability of credit has improved dramatically over the last eight months or so. and we're even seeing people with bumps in their credit history, subprime borrowers, getting more acceptances of their car loans. and of course there are a lot of incentivized interest rates from the manufacturer's financing arms out there, as well. the overall softness in the european market and with japan in recession, we think we'll see likely more incentives from manufacture are ers for customer the coming months because they have capacity they're not using for those other market. so they will be targeting this u.s. market and the consumer is in a pretty good mood. part of that we believe is the stabilization of home prices which is the basic net egg for most middle class americans. >> it would seem whatever's going on where you ar
CNBC
Dec 5, 2012 4:00am EST
'll get. >> you know what, i think the environment, as you look out to next year, is really difficult, ross. i mean, you don't really know what is going to come out of the u.s. fiscal cliff, how damaging potentially that can be to u.s. confidence, u.s. activity. things seem to be holding up fairly well in china. but i think there is still going to be some concerns about the whole performance of the asian economy and whether that can actually pick up next year. and then, of course, in the eurozone itself, we seem to be mending the problems progressively and taking out the tail risks, which i think is good and that is the bottom line that investors should take going further forward, but at the same time, there are some elements that you can have. if you do a forecast, in a way you could come up with something like 1% quotes for next year, but at the same time, you have to be conscious that we've had such a battery of downside impact, downside negative news coming through really for all economists in the western world in the last few years. you have to be very cognizant of those. >> i th
CNBC
Dec 6, 2012 4:00am EST
not a cause for celebration. still a difficult operating environment. under the former chancellor's plan, we would have been borrowing less in the next three years. because the government has failed to get our economy growing and because the policies have pushed us into recent double dip recession, they'll be pr rowing 212 billion pounds more than they planned. put that in context, that is the equivalent of what we in the uk will be spending this financial year on health, transport and defense in aggregate. >> you were talking quite rightly about the low level of he have credit growth in the uk, which has obviously been a feature of this period. but there's a question of what's cause and what's effect there. the banks will tell you that that problem is not so much availability of credit, there's credit demand and even in the mortgage sector which under normal circumstances you might have been eager to see people borrow money. we're seeing net repayments for the first time for a very, very long time. so you can take the economy to water, but you can't make it drink. how do you respond. >> i s
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6